gracefully NOTED

Philadelphia, PA

Design

layers cloud chair

Meghan HarcarComment

I am pretty obsessed with the Layers Cloud Chair by Richard Hutton. For each chair, the pattern is drawn out on the fabric, cut out using a CNC machine, and then manually assembled. The design references the pigments of layered rock found in Painted Desert, Arizona and nearly 100 colors were used to achieve the effect. love love love.

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The chair will be at the Salone de Mobile as part of Kvadrat's Divina exhibition next month.

via Dezeen and Contemporist.

archist city

Meghan HarcarComment

Archist City is a set of prints by Barcelona based illustrator Federico Babina that depicts architectural structures based on the aesthetics of famous artists. Each print focuses on a different artist and describes the artist's signature style using architecture. This is such a clever, imaginative and fun set of prints. Each time I see them, the make me smile. I haven't been able to pick a favorite yet, but which one is your fave? 

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old london layered with the new

Meghan HarcarComment

In each of the pieces featured below, London-based Redditor shystone has ingeniously matched up 18th and 19th century paintings of specific places in London with the photos of how the city looks today. I love how the mash up allows the viewer to compare the architecture and surroundings of contemporary London with what these artists captured and observed centuries ago. This project was particularly suited to London, which has preserved so much of its architectural history, making it even more interesting to notice what stayed the same and what changed. The different scenes depicted around the architecture add another layer to the comparison by presenting the types of activities that occurred at those locations in the past, but placing them in the present.  I have a particular fondness for the first match up depicting the Strand since I lived there in grad school!

I hope you enjoy these as much as I did!

The Strand Looking East from Exeter Exchange (1822) by Artist Unknown

The Strand Looking East from Exeter Exchange (1822) by Artist Unknown

St. Martins in the Fields (1888) by William Logsdail

St. Martins in the Fields (1888) by William Logsdail

Northumberland House (1752) by Canaletto

Northumberland House (1752) by Canaletto

The 9th of November, 1888 (1890) by William Logsdail

The 9th of November, 1888 (1890) by William Logsdail

Westminster Abbey with a Procession of Knights of the Bath (1749) by Canaletto

Westminster Abbey with a Procession of Knights of the Bath (1749) by Canaletto

The River Thames with St. Paul's Cathedral on Lord Mayor's Day (1746) by Canaletto

The River Thames with St. Paul's Cathedral on Lord Mayor's Day (1746) by Canaletto

View of the Grand Walk (1751) by Canaletto

View of the Grand Walk (1751) by Canaletto

Covent Garden Market (1737) by Balthazar Nebot

Covent Garden Market (1737) by Balthazar Nebot

A View of Greenwich from the River (1750-2) by Canaletto

A View of Greenwich from the River (1750-2) by Canaletto

Blackman Street London (1885) by John Atkinson Grimshaw

Blackman Street London (1885) by John Atkinson Grimshaw

Originally seen here. Shystone on imgur.

stories told in three dimensions...

Meghan HarcarComment

How beautiful are these paper books by Japanese graphic designer Yusuke Oono?  Each 40-page book creates a visual narrative that illustrates a specific moment from a story.  The books can be unfolded to be viewed in the round, giving the viewer a 360 degree view of the characters and scenery, or can be viewed flat, creating a diorama of sorts, that changes depending on the page you are on. The cut out forms and the negative space that these books create are gorgeous.  I love how the dual colors of paper gives each piece depth and added interest. The amount of foresight to design a scene in the round, with each page of the book having to both work on its own, and fit in with the scene as a whole is really inspiring. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did!

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via this is colossal. Images from here and here

paper hummingbirds

Meghan HarcarComment
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How gorgeous are these paper hummingbirds by artist Cheong-ah Hwang! Besides depicting one of my favorite subjects, these little sculptures in relief are so intricate, and achieve so much depth that really take on the appearance of a three-dimensional hummingbird. I love the way she feathers the paper to create the hummingbird's wings, it makes the whole object look so light and graceful, just like a hummingbird in mid flight. 

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seen at this is colossal. More of her work can be found here.

Christmas Card Displays

Meghan HarcarComment

It's that time of year again, when Holiday Cards start pouring in from family and friends.  Personally, it is one of my favorite things about the holidays and I love finding new and creative ways to display them.  Besides brightening up my day when I pass the holiday greetings and well wishes from loved ones,  they are a beautiful and festive looking decoration.

Do you display your cards? And do you have a preferred method?

xo, Meg

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holiday gift tags

Meghan HarcarComment

Have you ever gone on a gift wrapping frenzy, forgot to label the gifts, and then not known which is which? I am definitely guilty of this (especially since I am notorious for putting Christmas shopping and wrapping off until the last minute!).  The solution - gift tags! Whether you want something funny or classic, we have lots of options that will be the perfect addition to any beautifully wrapped gift! 

What do you think? I hope you like them!

Happy Friday Everyone!

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the reconstructionists

Meghan HarcarComment

Have you had the chance to check out the year long collaboration between illustrator Lisa Congdon and writer Maria Popova titled "The Reconstructionists"? The project can be summed up by the site's byline "A year long celebration of remarkable women who have changed how we see the world". Each blog entry celebrates one woman with a beautiful illustration that includes a quote by the subject, and a short well written synopsis of that woman's life and contribution to society.  The subjects range from artists, writers and scientists to unsung heroes.  Every Monday in 2013 they post about a different woman, and I have started really looking forward to it at the beginning of every week. I included some of my favorite illustrations below, but I highly recommend taking some time, browsing through the entries, and reading the intelligent and edifying bios.

Tie the Knot

Meghan HarcarComment

Do you know someone getting married? Two of our newest offerings are all about celebrating the act of "Tying the Knot"!  The first card is actually based on the save the date that I designed for my own wedding, where the knot forms the shape of a heart. I like to call it the "Love Knot".  The second is titled the "Philadelphia Love Knot" and the idea for the card originated from my deep-seeded love of Philadelphia soft pretzels (handed down from my Mom!).  The soft pretzel is such an iconic symbol of Philadelphia and this card would be perfect to celebrate with anyone who loves the city or the carb-y goodness that is the soft pretzel!

The cards shown below, as well as any of the others in our shop, can all be customized with names, dates or other personalized info. Below you can see how we recently customized the Philadelphia Love Knot card for a couple who love Philly. Check out our custom designs page for more info!

I hope you like them!  I would love to hear what you think! We will be adding new designs to our shop in the next day or two, so check back soon!

Happy Friday!

 

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My Heart Skips a "Beet"

Meghan HarcarComment

Introducing one of gracefully NOTED's newest designs, "My Heart Skips a "Beet""!  This playful card stems from my own personal love of beets and is a fun way to let someone know that you care. What do you think? This card is currently available in our shop so make sure to go over and check it out! Over the next couple of weeks I will be formally introducing a bunch of new cards so make sure to visit us again soon!

Happy Monday! 

Library Love

Meghan HarcarComment

A little hump day fun. I am loving the Bibliothèque Méjanes in Aix-en-Provence, France and am now wishing more libraries/bookstores could be in the shape of books. It also makes me want to re-read Le Petit Prince.

Hope everyone is having a good day! 

Bibliothèque Méjanes, Aix-en-Provence, France

Bibliothèque Méjanes, Aix-en-Provence, France

Image from Pinterest

mechanical sculpture on a small scale

Meghan Harcar1 Comment

I have really been enjoying the intricacies of miniature sculptures made out of old mechanical parts; be it typewriter pieces, parts of old watches, small lightbulbs or other found objects. The following examples manage to transform the mechanical parts that comprise each piece from cold and sterile objects, to whimsical and playful works of art.  Additionally, it is also always great when you see an artist using recycled or found source material.

Below are three of my recent favorites.

Jeremy Mayer's swallows are made of old typewriter parts and are assembled without glue or soldering. Each piece is assembled using parts that are native to the typewriter and that's it. As icing on the cake, his design even allows for the wings to partially retract. These pieces look so strong to me, it feels as though they can really fly.  

These little mechanical insects are made by the artist Justin Gershenson-Gates using recycled watch parts, light bulbs and other found objects. Each piece is made by hand, and the resulting whimsical assemblies are so interesting. They almost look like they belong in a pixar movie.

Sue Beatrice of All Natural Arts creates steampunk watch part sculptures made out of repurposed antique time pieces and other recycled watch parts. As seen below, she assembles the parts into sculptures of animals, humans, and even mythical creatures, such as the sea monster which can be seen below. I am a little obsessed with these pieces.  The way they are assembled, so you can see all the moving parts, it really seems as though they could come to life and even serve as some sort of talisman.

Do you have any favorite miniature sculptures? 

Hope everyone is having a good week so far!

via here, here & here.